Visit Website

Daily Science Fiction


Daily Science Fiction publishes original science fiction and fantasy every weekday, defining "science fiction" in the broad sense of the term, including sci-fi, fantasy, slipstream -- whatever you'd likely find in the science fiction section of your local bookstore. Their stories are mostly short short fiction (flash fiction), the right length to read on a coffee break, over lunch, or as a bedtime tale. Topics are eclectic: you can find everything from aliens to time travel, fairy tales to wizard tales, and read what intrigues you. Visit their website to subscribe via email and receive each story in your inbox every weekday for free.

Stories

Free

Barbara A. Barnett

43 Responses to "In Memory of Dr. Alexandra Nako"

Published Sep 18, 2017 · 1,416 words (6 minutes) · 733 views

Horror Humor

Free

Free

Helena Bell

Migrating Bears

Published Sep 18, 2017 · 3,689 words (14 minutes) · 685 views

Fantasy

Free

Free

Stewart C Baker

Little More than Shadows

Published Sep 18, 2017 · 626 words (3 minutes) · 1 like · 810 views

Strange

Free

Free

Wendy Nikel

Sardines in a Tin Can

Published Sep 17, 2017 · 1,541 words (6 minutes) · 1 like · 808 views

Science Fiction near future first person POV Robots With Feels Robots space travel escape sci-fi

A group of laborers on a distant planet plot their escape from their work camp.

Free

Free

Tanya Breshears

Cyclical

Published Jun 29, 2017 · 1,450 words (6 minutes) · 10 likes · 1176 views

Science Fiction Love What is time anyway? speculative aliens melancholy friendship Poignant

Free

The South Australian Health & Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) is a unique building in Adelaide’s new health research district in the city. Not only is the building beautiful from the outside, with its unique tiled windows adorned with individual shades, but its interior is even more impressive.

In the rear atrium there is this beautiful helical staircase which leads researchers and scientists up and down the levels of open office spaces.

This photo is shot looking directly up, inside the centre void of the helix.